Thomas E. Rohrer

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Mar
2011
Vol. 30. No. 1

Update on the Management of High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Chrysalyne D. Schmults, MD, MSCE | Nicole R. LeBoeuf, MD

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is the second most common malignancy
occurring in white patients in the United States and incidence rates are increasing. While
the majority of the 87,000-760,000 cases that occur yearly in the U.S. are curable, 4%
develop lymph node metastases and 1.5% die from the disease. Given the frequency of
occurrence of CSCC, it is estimated to cause as many deaths yearly as melanoma, with the
majority occurring in patients with high risk tumors or in those at high risk for metastasis
due to a variety of host factors, most commonly systemic immunosuppression. There are
currently no standardized prognostic or treatment models to assist clinicians in most
effectively identifying and managing these patients. Identification of patients at risk for poor
outcomes as well as standardization regarding classification, staging, and treatment of
high-risk tumors is critical for optimizing patient care. In this article, available literature on
the classification and management of high risk CSCC is briefly summarized, emphasizing
new information.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 30:26-34 © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Mar
2011
Vol. 30. No. 1

Current Approaches to Skin Cancer Management in Organ Transplant Recipients

Jerry D. Brewer, MD | Meena K. Singh, MD

Approximately 225,000 people are living with organ transplants in the United States. Organ
transplant recipients have a greater risk of developing skin cancer, including basal cell
carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma, with an approximately 250
times greater incidence of squamous cell carcinoma in certain transplant recipients,
compared with the general population. Because skin cancers are the most common
posttransplant malignancy, the resultant morbidity and mortality in these high-risk patients
is quite significant.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 30:35-47 © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Dec
2010
Vol. 29. No. 4

Office Management of Melanoma Patients

Marc D. Brown, MD

As the incidence of melanoma continues to increase, so does the role of the dermatologist as both medical and surgical oncologist for these patients. The dermatologist holds a key role in all phases of care, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. The dermatologist is best trained to complete a full and thorough skin examination and is best able to recognize a melanoma in its early stages of growth. Dermatologists have a unique opportunity to prevent melanoma through appropriate patient education concerning sun protection, self skin examinations, and the ABCDEs of melanoma recognition (ie, asymmetry, border irregularity, color variations, dimension and evolution). The dermatologist is well trained to obtain an appropriate full-thickness skin biopsy and is knowledgeable to interpret the pathologist report and understand the significance of the various histologic prognostic indexes. Most patients present with localized disease and with thinner Breslow depth and thus can be skillfully treated in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia by
a dermatologist.
Semin Cutan Med Surg 29:232-237 © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc.

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Dec
2003
Vol. 22. No. 4

Periocular Reconstruction

Paul H. Bowman, MD | Scott W Fosko, MD | Morris E. Hartstein, MD

Dermatologists should feel comfortable managing these lesions, performing excisions when indicated and closing the resultant defects.

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Dec
2003
Vol. 22. No. 4

Closing Surgical Defects of the External Ear

Suzanne Olbricht, MD | Nanette J Liegeois, MD, PhD

BENIGN AND MALIGNANT tumors as well as chronic scarring processes are common on the external ear and are easily amenable to surgical extirpation. Closing surgical defects on the external ear however poses unique challenges.

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