Dirk M Elston

Guest Editor for the following articles:

Sep
2014
Vol. 33. No. 3

Spiders in dermatology

Chinmoy Bhate, MD | Jun K Kang, MD | Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH
Spider bites represent an unusual and potentially overrepresented clinical diagnosis. Despite a common fear of spiders, known as arachnophobia, current knowledge suggests that only a small number of families within the order Araneae are medically relevant. Moreover, most cutaneous spider reactions, including both evenomations and physical trauma, produce mild, local symptoms which may be managed with supportive care alone. The differential diagnosis for spider bites may be broad, especially if the offending arachnid is not seen or found. We describe a series of spiders relevant to the dermatologist in the United States. Semin Cutan Med Surg 33:123-127 © 2014 Frontline Medical Communications
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Sep
2014
Vol. 33. No. 3

Tropical dermatology: cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis and trombiculiasis

José Darío Martínez, MD | Kenneth J Tomecki, MD | Kristian Eichelmann, MD
In today’s world, many people can travel easily and quickly around the globe. Most travel travel-related illnesses include fever, diarrhea, and skin disease, which are relatively uncommon in returning travelers. We review four of the most common emerging infestations and skin infections in the Americas, which are important to the clinical dermatologist, focusing on the clinical presentation and treatment of cutaneous larva migrans, gnathostomiasis, cutaneous amebiasis, and trombiculiasis. Semin Cutan Med Surg 33:133-135 © 2014 Frontline Medical Communications
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Sep
2014
Vol. 33. No. 3

What’s new in the treatment and diagnosis of dermatophytosis?

David A Wetter, MD | Valerie Laniosz, MD, PhD
Superficial fungal infections of the skin and nails are common in humans and can cause patients substantial discomfort. Additionally, patients may find the physical appearance of these infections to be distressing. Although the infectious fungi have evolved to parasitize humans, the ability to treat and diagnose fungal infections has been slower to progress. Nevertheless, there are promising new advancements in the treatment and diagnosis of dermatophyte infection. New topical and light-based treatments for dermatophytoses are available, and the first meta-analysis of topical antifungal treatments has been performed. Diagnostic improvements are forthcoming for dermatophytoses with the advent of molecular techniques for rapid identification and speciation of dermatophytes. Semin Cutan Med Surg 33:136-139 © 2014 Frontline Medical Communications
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Sep
2014
Vol. 33. No. 3

Coccidioidomycosis

David J DiCaudo, MD
Coccidioidomycosis is a common, environmentally acquired, pulmonary fungal infection in arid and semi-arid regions of the West, especially Arizona and California. The infection is frequently associated with striking cutaneous manifestations. Reactive, immunologically mediated eruptions include erythema nodosum, a generalized exanthem, Sweet syndrome, and reactive granulomatous dermatitis. Less commonly, the skin can harbor the actual organisms as a result of dissemination from the lungs. Dermatologists may play a key role in the recognition of coccidioidomycosis Semin Cutan Med Surg 33:140-145 © 2014 Frontline Medical Communications
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Sep
2014
Vol. 33. No. 3

Subcutaneous (deep) fungal infections

George W Elgart, MD
Fungal infection is a common clinical problem in dermatology. While most cases in practice are superficial infections, invasive subcutaneous mycoses are important to recognize and treat, as these conditions often have significant morbidity and mortality. Deep fungi demonstrate species-specific syndromes and may be identified by clinical and histological features in addition to serological evaluation and culture. Identification of the common innoculation subcutaneous mycoses, as well as those associated with pulmonary primary infection and dissemination to the skin is important, as treatments vary by organism and clinical setting. This overview will help to identify the key dermatological presentations of subcutaneous fungal infection, and the clues they give to cause. Semin Cutan Med Surg 33:146-150 © 2014 Frontline Medical Communications
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